Internet dating statistics divorce

With the proliferation of dating apps and websites, it's no secret that it has become pretty common to start dating someone you met online.While some popular dating sites take pride in its role in matching couples, a new study found that people who met online are more likely to break-up, as opposed to couples that met in the real world.These couples tended to be happier in their relationships than couples who met offline, the researchers report this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Most of us know long-lasting couples that first connected on the Internet, but researchers from Michigan State University and Stanford found that both divorce and separation rates of people who meet online are higher than those who are first introduced in traditional settings.

The study found that relationships that start online are 28 percent more likely to end within a year.

Of 19,131 couples who met online and got married, only around 7% were either separated or divorced (the overall U. Cacioppo, director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at The University of Chicago and one of the study’s authors.

The study was funded by online-dating site e but was overseen by independent statisticians, Cacioppo says.

Each client paid five dollars and answered more than a hundred multiple-choice questions. (A previous installment had been about a singles bar—Maxwell’s Plum, on the Upper East Side, one of the first that so-called “respectable” single women could patronize on their own.) She had planned to interview Altfest, but he was out of the office, and she ended up talking to Ross.

One section asked subjects to choose from a list of “dislikes”: “1. The batteries died on her tape recorder, so they made a date to finish the interview later that week, which turned into dinner for two. Looking back now, he says that he considered computer dating to be little more than a gimmick and a fad.Online romance In their survey of 19,131 people (just one person from each married couple participated), Cacioppo and his colleagues found 92 percent were still married in 2012, 7.44 percent were separated or divorced and about 0.5 percent were widowed.Of the approximately one-third of married couples who met online, 45 percent met on online dating sites (the most popular were e Harmony and Match.com, which were responsible for half of the dating-site matches)."The time-tested qualities of trust and intimacy still remain important factors on determining whether a couple stays together, regardless of whether they meet offline or online," says Brenda K.Wiederhold, editor- in-chief of Virtual Reality Medical Institute, Brussels, Belgium and Interactive Media Institute.In the fall of 1964, on a visit to the World’s Fair, in Queens, Lewis Altfest, a twenty-five-year-old accountant, came upon an open-air display called the Parker Pen Pavilion, where a giant computer clicked and whirred at the job of selecting foreign pen pals for curious pavilion visitors. Within a year, more than five thousand subscribers had signed on. It would invite dozens of matched couples to singles parties, knowing that people might be more comfortable in a group setting. They wound up in the pages of the New York subscriber.

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